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Arlene Boop (she/her)

Board Secretary

Arlene Boop is a graduate of Brown University and received her JD from the New York University School of Law in 1975 and was admitted to both the NYS and Pa bars in 1975. During law school, she was not only active in clinical programs, offering civil legal assistance to the women of the Bedford Hills Prison and to young emancipated adults through an Urban Clinic program, she participated as a member of the National Lawyers Guild with the interviewing of inmates of the Brooklyn House of Detention relative to the pre-trial conditions which significantly impeded their ability to mount a defense to the criminal changes against them. On graduation, she then worked as a stagg attorney and later managing attorney of one of the neighborhood office until her return to New York where she joined the four attorney law firm of Stolar Alterman & Guliemetti. The firm, of which she became a partner eventually, became the present firm of Alterman & Boop LLP and handles both a wide variety of civil rights cases, plaintiff side employment, and public accommodation discrimination cases as well as a significant amount of litigation on behalf of neighborhood organizations including law suits which forced the Department of Sanitation to vacate the Ganservort Peninsula so that the space could be made part of the Hudson River Park in accordance with the enacting legislation. She is also class counsel for a class of nearly 4,000 federal employees on whose behalf she has obtained summary judgment on liability for unpaid premium pay for work on Sundays. The practice also continues to have small neighborhood family practice components, representing small cooperative corporations in general governance issues, tenant representation, and basic real estate transactions. She also advice a number of small non profits such as a family operated Cultural Center of Iroquois Culture and History in the Adirondacks. She is the mother of two sons, age 31 and 26. She and her husband enjoy hiking, music, and almost anything to do with the water. She looks forward to resuming playing her violin as she attempts to cut down her active litigration case load. She came to a studio performance of Earl Mosley's Diversity of Dance about four years ago and was captivated by the heartful artistry and has since come to value the organization for it's incredible sense of community. 

Photo courtesy of Arlene Boop

Arlene Boop (she/her)